fbpx
Lesson 40 of 75
In Progress

01-14-20 – Jessica

jess 1-14-20

[00:00:00] Hi everyone. We are live. Um, I am setting up, I have a new, uh, web cam. Um, so if I look particularly terrible today, that’s why, um, cause I have a new webcam, but I have not set up any kind of, um, uh, led light yet. So I just have the web cam, which is like so much better than a normal camera. And then I have no light cause I just moved my office.

So. If you see some of the older QA QAs, my office was upstairs in a bedroom that I just moved back mother-in-law and two on Friday. And it was break. Cause I think she’s right here in the kitchen, outside my window. So yeah. So, um, my, I have to, I haven’t set up my office yet, but I’m excited to have a window.

Um, also I have new, I have a whole new eyeglass thing happening, so I went to the eye doctor. He told me that my prescription was like, way, way, way off. And I [00:01:00] had a feeling cause like, I couldn’t see, especially at night, like I couldn’t like see at all at night when, especially when I was driving. So, um, she was like, okay, so we’re going to fix your prescription, but you’re also gonna need reading lesson.

I was like, well, I already wear glasses. And she was like, right, but you’re only 44. So I can’t give you bifocals, but. I can fix your distance so that you can read, read when you’re driving. I’m like, great. But what about, she was like, well, you’re going to need readers. So now I wear contact lenses so that I can see distance.

Oh my God. Look at that bags under my eyes. Oh my God. By the way, that’s not makeup. That’s actually my face. Y’all like I got punched every day. Um, yeah. So, so I can see far away, but now I need these goofy ass readers to see anything close up, including. What I’m reading here. So I know I look all nerdy, but I can just leave it like that.

But see then I still can’t see and less. So in other words, the only way I can do this QA is if I look at you all, like I’m [00:02:00] Poindexter and I’m just going to have to deal with it right now, because I don’t have my better readers on today. So let’s get started with the first question. If that’s okay with you use guys, as they say in Philadelphia, um, I am refreshing just so that I can make sure that I can see the, uh, questions that were in here before.

So let me just take a look and make sure I’ve got everything all set up. Okay. I do. I mean, I guess I don’t look that bad. I just look kind of rough around the edges. I worked out this morning and for those of you who work out. First of all, I’m like a hundred pounds overweight, but also I’m 10 years older than everyone else I work out with.

But also I did a plank this morning and it was a minute and 30 seconds of me planking. And for those of you who don’t know, like it’s like when you’re, I don’t even know if I can do it, my fingers. It’s like when you’re like, just on your elbows and toes and that’s it. I planked this morning. It was one minute 30 seconds.

I was so proud of myself. It was unbelievable. Okay. I’m going to [00:03:00] start with Karen Jackson. Oh, actually, Karen, I asked Karen to give me a little bit of extra elaboration, so I don’t see her on the call yet, but I’m going to try and answer her question. So the first question today is how do you feel about doing a test audience before changing or launching a show?

And this is a really interesting concept because I’ve never considered like how I would get an audience. Like how does one go about, I mean, people use test audiences for literally everything, for movies, for television, for products. Why would it not be for podcasts? Um, I can’t, I couldn’t think of any good reason.

Like, I mean, except for, for the fact that podcasts, so podcasts, audio, chances are kind of a special breed. Like they, they have to really go out of their way to listen to a podcast. Like everything else products are in the store TV, you just turn on, you know, but, but pod-casters have to like, Either know what the show [00:04:00] is, or have been searching for your particular topic, download it, press play, and then do whatever activity, you know, it’s like, no one just goes and it’s on.

So is a test audience going to feel the same way about your show as someone who sought it out, whether on purpose or by accident? The answer to me is no. So if, if, as long as you keep that in mind, when you’re using a test audience, like, just remember that, like you’ve forced them into this on some level.

And as a result, they’re not going to be as enthusiastic as a person. Who’s like, Peeing in their pants about the topic that you’re talking about and can’t wait to listen. And those are, that’s a normal podcast audience, normal podcast. Audiences are audiences that cannot wait to hear what you have to say about this topic.

So that’s the only danger I think, with a, with testimonials, if anyone else has any like, thoughts about that, I would love to hear them, [00:05:00] but that’s my opinion about that so far. And if she wants to elaborate and talk to me a little bit about how she would do that. That would be great. Yeah. Um, hi Bonnie, how are you?

And hi to everyone. Let me just say hi to everyone else here. So hi, Nora, Betty, Danielle. Hi John. Hi Lena. Hi, Karen. It’s funny. I just see you guys. Hi. Okay. I’m going to move on to Danielle Jacobs, Erwin who by the way, asks such good questions every week. So thank you Danielle for them because it makes my brain exercise.

Ooh. Ah, Ooh. Ah, okay. Hi Jess, can you go over when you do and don’t have to put sponsored or hashtag sponsored or hashtag ad in a social media post, a small company paid me for a sponsored episode. So any post I did to promote the episode or use the hashtag, they helped me research and plan an upcoming trip.

If I want to post about this, do I need those hashtags in the second situation? I’m not paying them, but they are giving me a service. [00:06:00] Well then technically you’re their sponsor if that’s the case and what if you just want to post about them because you think they’re great, then you can post about them without putting sponsor or without putting ad the fact that they help you research is perfectly fine.

Hi, Jennifer. Sorry about that is perfectly fine. I think, um, I think that if they’re helping you with something, it’s nice to return. The favor with a shout out. You certainly don’t have to, and you definitely don’t. Oops, sorry. And you definitely don’t have to. Say anything about them having paid you, you could, if you wanted to, you could say, you know, they sponsored an episode back, but the only time you really have to do it is when you’re promoting the episode, they specifically sponsored that’s it?

Um, she’s a followup question. Um, I’m in talks with the company. What if, if we get them as a sponsor, When do I use those hashtags? For example, there’s another podcast I listened. That’s completely sponsored by a company. Whenever they post a new episode, they write presented by our friends, blah, but they don’t have sponsor or ad.

[00:07:00] Yeah. So that’s a, that’s kind of a tricky, like, I guess slope, because there’s okay. So there’s different levels of sponsorship. Like. If you’re so Elsie and I, when we, as far as I know, when we post about our show, we have a sponsor right now. MeetEdgar every time I posted about she podcasts, I did not put hashtag sponsored or hashtag ad because the post is not sponsored.

So therefore I can post about it all day long and it’s still my post. And so if you have an underwriter or a sponsor sponsoring your show, but they did not purchase any specific. Social posts. You don’t have to use that hashtag because it’s coming from your heart or generosity or whatever you want to do.

The only time you have to put sponsor or add is when you are average, specifically advertising a product that you’ve been paid for in that post. So like, uh, for example, the [00:08:00] closest thing to me, cause I just moved. Okay. Uh, shit I don’t even have. Okay. So like really don’t have anything. Hold on one second.

And you’re like washi tape. Right. I don’t even know why this is here because I don’t use it washi tape. So it’s one thing to be like, um, you know, if, if this manual facture gave me $10 to, you know, as then I would say on the, on the show, the show is sponsored by washi tape. But if then I post on Facebook, um, our sh you know, This is episode three, you can say sponsored by washy tape, but you don’t have to, the only time you really have to do it was when you’re like, look it guys.

I like this washi tape and they paid me $10 to tell you that I love it. Washy tape. That’s why. And when you need the hashtag hi, Karen, how are you? I’m glad you’re here because I did cover your question, but I’m going to go back to it. Um, so anyway, Danielle, I hope that answers your question. Let’s go back to Karen’s for question, uh, for just because I did cover that about using a test [00:09:00] audience.

My, my thought about using a test on is, and I’ll just very quickly say like, An actual podcast audience is very, very enthusiastic. Whereas a test audience doesn’t always know what they’re in for. So unless you choose a test audience that, you know, for a fact to be enthusiastic, you have to keep in mind that whatever pains they give you, um, may not be as.

Gung-ho as the people who are trying to find your show and download it and listen to it authentically because a podcast audience is very, very loyal. They’re very, very active and they’re very, very verbal I’ve test audience. On the other hand is like, I said forced into it, but I don’t want to assume that I’m, I don’t want to assume that they’re forced into it.

You can tell me how I think actually a better answer to the question would be tell me how you find the test audience, but either way an authentic podcast audience is going to be very enthusiastic. And I almost feel like why do a test audience when you can just post the show? And see what people think and then ask [00:10:00] them, just ask your audience, like whoever listens at first, like, Hey, what do you guys think?

If you don’t like it, then you can just change it. Like nothing. I think maybe actually now I think the answer is just like going through all that trouble. I don’t think it is worth your time. I think if you just post it hope for the best, ask your audience to respond for you, beg them to respond to you.

Um, you know, they will, they do. And they will. I think those of us who are in this call right now that I’ve had a show for a while, can tell you, podcast listeners are not shy. It’s not like blogging and it’s not like social media. They talk back often. Um, so don’t be afraid to ask them what you want to know and don’t bother with a test because I don’t think those are, I don’t think those are people that are necessarily going to listen without that test.

And then you don’t have a good cross section of audience anyway. Okay, I’m going to move on to, um, it’s not LCS question. It’s Jennifer Rauner. Hi Jennifer. Um, this, she posted in Patriot, but, um, you know, it also, you just gave it to me at an organization. Okay. Brand spanking new super squad member here, Hill [00:11:00] Hill.

I am working on my first podcast. My goal is to launch in March while my podcast is coming out of a community. It isn’t yet an established website or online community yet. There’s an upcoming Netflix special one 24 available that may spark some interest in my subject. So I’m wondering if I should hurry up and try to get a trailer done and then a quick website in case folks do start looking, but then again, all I have to offer is coming soon in no real content yet.

And that got me thinking about whether or not I should work on site and branding for now a bit. So it’s all one place. And then turn my focus back to episodes. Any best practices or advice. Mmm. Hi, so, yeah, so I’m not sure. Um, I get that you would want to rush. Okay. So first of all, let’s just talk about this right now.

It’s the 14th. So you have 10 days until the show [00:12:00] on Netflix, right? We have 10 days. So what do we, what is the best use of our 10 days? Do we. Do a website and branding and put up a trailer, do ween post a couple episodes of content, forget the website and the branding, and just put up content as fast as possible.

Or do we just go about our business and launch in March with no rushing whatsoever? And so, um, the first thing I’m going to say is. See only because it’s the least stressful. And whenever podcasting is stressful, sometimes things go wrong, you get technical difficulties. And like it’s true that launching a podcast is never as simple as you expect it to be.

There’s always something that’s going to happen that like, kind of like ruins your mojo right now. It’s this documentary for you. So that’s number one. So first right off the bat, I’m not sure we should care about the documentary [00:13:00] because. For example, the fire festival that came out last, I think winter, same, same time frame.

It was like, end of January, we were still talking about it in March. In fact, I still bring it up. I mean, we were talking about it six months later, it was a hell of a documentary. And I think that. If the documentary is hot, your podcast will be equally as hot when it does come out. But I wouldn’t say put something up before the documentary, just know that the documentary will spark interest.

Therefore you do have an incentive to not procrastinate. Get it done as soon as possible, as far as episodes versus branding in general.

for me, the easier thing to do is branding. So I would do the branding first, but some people are bursting with content, but have no idea what they want their brand to look like in that case, I would do the episodes. And I know that’s kind of like a do what’s best for you kind of like bullshit answer, [00:14:00] but it’s not because.

Once, one of them’s out of the way, you can focus your time and attention and clear head on the other one, but you’re not going to be able to focus on the one when you’re feeling like maybe you should do the other. And like, if you already know what you’re doing tens about, blasted out, just get it done for me, that would be like, you know, When I started leading business radio, the first thing I did was the logo not, I mean, you know, and then I made a list of all the people that I wanted to interview and was she podcasts?

Elsie suggested, Hey, let’s have a show called she podcast. And the next day I had a website and a logo for her because I think in pictures and I want, I need to be able to imagine the thing before I can work on the thing, but some people are the opposite of that. They. They just know the thing they don’t want to deal with.

What happens with the thing? What happens around the thing? Like sometimes the podcast is just all you have. And so if that’s all you have in your head and that’s what you know, will come pouring [00:15:00] out of you, that’s the part you do first. And if you are a brander and a marketer and somebody who can’t. You know, like you can’t go to a restaurant unless you’ve seen the menu or you can’t, you know, you know, if ambiance is important to you, then you need to create the army yeah.

Through your show for yourself, for your own head first. So that’s why I gave you that answer. Um, if there are follow up questions, Jennifer, let me know, but I hope that’s okay. Helpful. Lisa Macentyre Gibson. Hello? How are you, Lisa? I don’t even know if she’s in here, but. Here’s your question. Um, her show, I shake my head release in Sam is now getting between 1,002 thousand downloads for each new weekly episode in the first week.

Should we try sponsorship through dynamic ads? We’re with pod bean, how will advertisers know how to find us or try to find spot sponsors other ways. So, um, I wonder if I can share my screen. Can I share my screen with you guys? I don’t know that I can, so, okay. Um, When it comes to sponsored. So you, you do [00:16:00] have a great a thousand to $2,000 is great.

Is great. As far as sponsorship is concerned, if you try to go with pod bean or any agency right now, they’re still gonna be tell you that a thousand downloads an episode is about 30, which means you’re making like 120 a month. But if you got sponsors on your own. Reached out yourself, um, and, and made your own media kit and your own app, add packages.

You could price what you wanted, explain why the price is what it is and sort of do that yourself. If you guys don’t want to do it yourself, you just want an easy way to get sponsors right away then yes, I would go through Podbean just to see if it works. Just to have the experience. If it doesn’t work, you can always do the harder thing later.

It’s the same question as before actually it’s like do the easy thing first. Always do the easy shift first, because then you don’t have to think about that being on your list anymore. You can just bang it out and get it done. Not everyone works that way, but I do. Um, there’s another, there’s another service called pod corn.

Have you guys heard of it? You have to sign up and then, um, [00:17:00] And then you get sent, like they have all kinds of different companies that are coming in and out and in and out. Um, That wants to sponsor podcasts. And so you can sort of bid your show on them and like, you know, I mean your price doesn’t have to be like everybody else’s price again.

You can price it however you want. And then you just sort of do an application. Like it’s a resume. You send them your resume, your, your show resume, you build a little profile on there and then they just, you know, the advertisers themselves can either say yes or no. Again, that’s an easy way to get started.

So. Better to do the easy, um, fast way first, if it doesn’t work for you, then you still have time to do the other way, however you want. Um, Oh, so going back to Jennifer’s question about which to do first for John, he says I would produce the episode first because it’s easiest for me. I hate the other stuff.

So I’ve learned to do the stuff I hate first, so I can get to what I like. That’s interesting. So, [00:18:00] um, Yeah. So for him that episode’s easier for me. It’s not, I have to really think that part. I mean, I, I pretty much will talk on the fly, but I can’t focus on it until I know what it looks like. Cause I’m weird.

I guess I’m just weird. What can I say? Um, okay. Let’s see. Oh, they contacted you yesterday. Oh, popcorn. Give it a try. See what you guys think. Um, okay, I’m going to go to the next question. It’s from John. When a cohost gives you a new last name and it becomes more popular than your real name. Should you have it legally changed in your case?

The answer is yes. Tell a little vote in the group right now. I can’t do a poll. But just tell me which one you prefer. John Buchanan, which is his actual God-given Christian name or the one I named him, which is John Domingo. John Domingo just rolls off the tongue. It’s perfect. John D’Amico. Everyone can remember it.

Everyone can spell it, but tennis is a pain in the ass. Just go ahead and put in here. Put in the comments. I [00:19:00] don’t even know if you’re this way or this way, but whether or not you like beginners or Domingo, I’d love to know. And let’s settle this once and for all okay. Onto the next question. April Moreno.

I have a question in a few months, I would like to do a celebration event to celebrate my one year, my podcast. I’ve not done a launch before. Can you share some tips, ideas, advice on how I can plan a one year birthday party for my podcast child? Uh, yes, I can. My. My advice is to have a, um, if you can do like see how I have all this set up, but it’s like a Facebook live, but I’m still recording into a mic.

It sounds professional. If you could do a Facebook live. That you’re recording at the same time into audition or however you record. Um, do I think you should have an event like a Facebook live event, party invite everyone on your list. And I do mean everyone, everyone you’re Facebook friends with should be on that list, have an anniversary party, do some giveaways.

They don’t have to be [00:20:00] podcast related. They can be. Um, Amazon gift cards, they can be, you know, depending on your topic, they can be topic related. They can be a business related, they could be fitness related, but you do some giveaways like, and, and do a live taping of your show and let people see what it’s like.

And I think that would be a really fun way to celebrate your accomplishment of doing podcasting for a year, which regardless of how many downloads you have, that is a huge accomplishment. Doing podcasting for a year is hard. And now, you know, it’s hard, sorry, but it is, um, her followup question is if the question’s too broad, I’m interested mainly in the PR awareness part of growing up podcasts were still about, well, you know, 25 to 30 downloads per episode.

So, um, the awareness thing is, is tricky. So I always go back to social media. And if anyone wants to comment on whether or not that’s true, I mean, Bonnie, we already know Bonnie will say social media, she’s a social media consultant, but, um, Not everyone listens to podcasts, but everyone is on [00:21:00] social media, just that is just facts and studies and demographics.

About 20% of the United States know about podcasting, 6 billion people are on Facebook and Twitter and Instagram and LinkedIn. So the only way to really get your show into the hands of people who may or may not listen, you have to, first of all, put them in front of people who are, um, elsewhere. And second of all, you have to put them in front of people who, um, maybe heard a podcast before.

And actually, even if you podcasts was getting a thousand or 2000 downloads an episode, you still have to do that because if you don’t keep growing those channels, then you don’t really get a new audience, but there’s no, there’s no special trick, like put this in your title and then you’ll get tons of downloads or.

Well, there’s really no secret other than getting, I mean, the trick is get your podcasts in front of people that might like it that have never heard about it before. That’s [00:22:00] going to be probably on social media or somewhere else. I don’t know, but I mean, I’m assuming social media, Facebook groups, et cetera, post about it when you can grow those channels with other types of content and your podcast.

And then, um, You know, if you need to, or if you want to small paid ads usually work. They worked for me. They worked for us big time. Um, and we don’t do paid advertising anymore, but we, but I used to, and I started my solo show. I did, I boosted my Facebook page post for $20 every week. So I spent like 80 bucks on it and you know, it would get me about 400 to 500 new listens and it worked really well.

So. Depending on how much you can do that, make sure that you’re targeting. If you are going to advertise, target your exact right person, mom and or the man with the specific age specific interest, you can do that on Facebook now very easily. And I think that’s really important in exposure. The only other place people are is online.

You can guarantee [00:23:00] people are online. You can’t really guarantee that they’re going to be, I mean, getting their email address, people also do that online. Everything that you wanted, you do grow, people grow it online. So this is going to be the same thing. I’m okay. It looks like John Domingo is the winner all except for Lena who says that was his name?

When I met him. Well, I didn’t rename him. I just think Domingo’s a better name. He can use whatever he wants. This is J a is a jump Mingo. That’s his radio name and I, I like it. Okay. So Danielle had another, she had a, like a, a question when she popped in. She had another question. Here we go. Another question regarding affiliate marketing.

Is it worth doing affiliate marketing, such as Amazon or audible on my website, I would put national park related books and gear. Or does that make sense? The website look too busy without much return. I have a small company that produces national park products. Contact me as well about affiliate marketing.

I feel like we’ve had a talk about that. The affiliate marketing, the program and stuff. [00:24:00] I think affiliate marketing is a good idea. However, I don’t think that many podcasts websites get a lot of traffic. So if you are going to do affiliate marketing, then I would suggest that you make sure you have Google analytics, um, working on your site and that you have key words on your site so that you can get some web traffic to that website because the whole point of the website is really to sell.

Your products and services or sell you as an expert and sell your advice or sell, you know, or do whatever, you know, hire you for something. So the website has to be a good sales tool, but if you’re going to do affiliate marketing, you might want to measure how much traffic it’s getting. Cause if it’s not going to get traffic, you’re not going to sell very much affiliate wise, but I think affiliate marketing is a great idea.

I also think that you can. Talk about the things that you recommend in your show and then point them to your show notes where you have Amazon links. That’s a good idea, too. It’s a great way to make a little, I mean, I don’t know that Amazon is the biggest moneymaker, but [00:25:00] I’m sorry. I thought I heard a lawn mower.

That’s weird. I don’t think it’s the biggest money maker, but there are like probably this other thing with the guidebooks would be better. And I always think they’re good. Anytime you can make money without having to. Like really, really hustle for it is worth at least an experiment. So I would experiment with it.

See if you like it, see if it, um, brings you in anything. And if it’s not worth it, it’s more hassle than it’s worth. And you can stop if, uh, if later on, if it’s not working for you, everyone voted Jemaine ago. I agree wholeheartedly. Sorry, John, the word of the day. Is Jengo okay. I don’t have any other questions right now to answer for you guys, but tell me, do you have any questions right now?

Oh, you know what I will do. Can you guys keep a secret? You have to tell me if you’re not going to keep a secret. I’m not going to tell you, but I will tell the super squad as long as you promise to keep it a secret, because I’m working very, [00:26:00] very hard to launch this. Um, but I need at least one person to make a comment that they can keep a secret.

Before I tell this. Are you ready here? I’ll even do like a duh, duh, duh, duh, duh, duh. I don’t see anyone. So you get no secrets. Good advice on affiliates. Thank you so much, Danielle. I’m glad that was helpful. Does anyone want to know where the next sheet podcast live is going to be before I hang up? Okay. I see two, two that want to keep a secret.

Okay. Ready? It is going to be same weekend in October, October 15th, through the 18th in Scottsdale Arizona, there is the link to the hotel.

Take a look. See what you think. Don’t tell anyone. I don’t have tickets on sale yet. I don’t have the website finished. I don’t have a sponsorship deck. I don’t know when I’m taking applications for speakers. All I have is the venue [00:27:00] and my diligent building here in the background to get all of it done at once.

So the first thing I’m going to do is create like an event and event bright and start selling early bird tickets. Um, Uh, you do not get a hotel promo code. You get nothing. Nothing. I tell you I have nothing. I just signed the contract. I don’t know if we get a promo code. I don’t know if there’s a pass key.

Nothing. You can have nothing, but you know where it’s going to be. And if you tell anyone I’m going to find you, I’m going to hunt you down and I’m gonna podcast right in your face. That’s what’s going to happen. Anyway. Does anyone have any other questions I can answer about marketing or sponsorship or.

Uh, what else, what else I can tell you about moving your mother-in-law into your extra bedroom and what that’s like anyone like to know? It’s been very interesting. Very interesting. I’ll tell you a funny story yesterday. Um, so like I’ve lived in my house like seven years and I’ve never like put a [00:28:00] lot of stuff on the walls.

Cause I’ve always been busy and my daughter was sick and like, I just never have not had time. Um, but she’s, you know, she’s 70. So like she’s had a whole lifetime to collect. Art and stuff to put on your wall. Anyway, she asked me, she said she had these beautiful, my husband and his sister from their bar bat mitzvah.

Like, do you guys know for those of you, you don’t know your bar and bat mitzvahs, like when you’re 12 and 13. So like, I actually had just ordered pictures of my kids for their bar and bat mitzvah, which by the way, they’re 21 and 20 days, like 10 years ago. And I’m just now getting this stuff done to hang it.

She was like, well, then just put Scott and Laura next to your kids. And I was like, I don’t want to see a picture of my husband at age 12 on my, in my hallway. Like, why would I, why the fuck would I want that? That’s weird. Um, no, I have a good daughter in law, Karen, and don’t let me, don’t let me change your mind about that.

I am definitely a good daughter a lot, and I love having her and I’m happy she’s here, which is a delightful lady, but I don’t, we have very, [00:29:00] very different tastes like. That bedroom, um, which looked, you know, like, like you can see all the colorful kind of stuff that I like and stuff like the bedroom is now pink, comforter, pink curtains, pink.

Um, rug pink, pink, pink, pink with flowers. And there’s doilies on every surface. Like that’s so not my gig. I can’t do it. So, um, yeah, so the decorating thing has been a little bit of a challenge, but I do love having her here. Oh, Mary, you have a question. Yay. Right now I only have a contact form for potential sponsors and I follow up by email.

Should I have an email sequence? No. Um, if you wanted to do. I don’t know how the form works, but if you wanted to put a link to the media kit in there, you know, you should have a response that says something to the effect of hi, I will get back to you as soon as possible. Thank you so much for your interest.

Here’s a link to my deck, and then if you want to do that, then you follow up with them. That’s fine. Or. I mean to me, a better sales [00:30:00] process is to follow up with them and get them to talk to you on the phone and then give them the prices. But sometimes people see the prices and they run before they even know what they’re getting.

I don’t like that. Um, Then again, I’m also a person who wants to know the prices right away. Cause I already know, but for me it’s cause I already know what I’m getting. Um, so that’s up to you. Whether or not you’re comfortable giving people the price is knowing that you haven’t had given them a chance to get to know you or your show very much at all.

However, I mean, if they are listening, they fill out the contact form. They’re pretty interested. So maybe it’s worth the risk. Maybe that’s their reward for filling out the I’m not changing my mind. I think you should give it to them. Give it to them. I bet you give it to them. Danielle writes, how many sponsor pitches do you put out at once?

Do you just send a ton out or only if you have direct con for this event? I send like a hundred a day. I’m sending a hundred a day for she podcasts live and for pod Fest, um, people that I know are interested plus people that I’ve never talked to you at all, just to see I’m like casting a net. I [00:31:00] know that you can only take one or two at a time, or you probably don’t want more than five on your show at a time.

You’re welcome. Um, but. You can gather 10 names and work 10 names, see how far you get. And then work 10 more. Every sales process is like a, they call it a numbers game because there’s always going to be people who ignore you. That’s gotta be at least two or three people. They’re always going to be two or three people that tell you, no, we’re going to be two or three people who are interested in don’t want to have anything to do with it.

And there’s going to be one or two say yes. So if you don’t have 10 people, that’s too many people. So you need at least 10 or 15 people to reach out to. So if you can find 10 or 15 leads at a time, work, those leads, see who says, yes, sign that person. Then you start all over again. And sometimes because you’ve started the process, those two or three people who are interested, but can’t do it right now, or don’t like the money or whatever, you can go back to them after you’ve had a sponsor.

And hit them again and hit them again and hit them again. So, [00:32:00] um, I think a couple, I think, yeah, I mean, it’s, hi, sounds like a lot 10 or 15, but, and especially because you have such a specialized show, but I still think you have lots of potential with gear and clothing and all kinds of stuff. Um, Karen, can you explain how we should set our sponsorship rates?

Have you ever heard of, or used podcasts underwriting? Just heard about this. It’s kind of like, I think underwriting is just sponsorship. Honestly. It’s like you get someone to pay for you to do your show, and then you just say the show is sponsored by, but it’s a sponsorship because you’re not a charity, so it’s not really underwriting, although I don’t know what your show is about.

So maybe it is, um, Setting rates has to be do it. This is a short version because there’s a long answer to that. I do. Uh, I do sponsorship the contract. If you look in files, you, I think I have some what’s in there. Um, uh, I think Elena’s asking me, do you have, uh, a new theme for your website recommendations?

Ella mentor, E L E M E N T O R it’s drag and drop [00:33:00] design. Yeah. I have a ton of demos that you can just import. Okay. So back to the, okay. How do you set your sponsorship rates? Rates are set by how much time you think it’s going to take for you to do what you’re offering to do and how much money you think they’ll make back from their ad.

And, you know, and it also depends on how much you’re willing to give away. So like with audio, how much time are you willing to give away from your show with website? As like, if you’re going to add website space, email space, social media, repetitions, like you have to sort of add those things up and say, okay, what’s all that worth for me to do.

What’s it worth for me to get this campaign started? How long is it going to take me to run this campaign? Then you have to give like a. You know, like a report at the end, is it going to be a pain in the ass to do that? Like you only want to offer audio or you only want to offer audio and a link in the show notes or link in the website in the show notes.

So you have to sort of [00:34:00] decide all the different channels you’re willing to work on. And then a lot of times with pricing. Gauge your feelings about it. Like if you know right now that like pain per month, you want more than $50 as you should, then, you know, what’s too high, $5,000. What’s in the middle there around two 2,500.

That’s probably too. Okay. So 300. Yeah. I could probably do that for 300. Would I feel cheated if I did it for 300? No, probably not. You know, like you kind of have to like. Wiggle your way into that number sometimes based on your gut, feeling about how valuable your audience is, if you think about it, just in terms of, I need the money what’ll end up happening is your, your advertiser.

Won’t get their money back in sales or exposure. And then, and you know, you know, they either, won’t resign with you and they’ll have a bad experience with podcast advertising. And then we all lose kind of, so you have to really, really think about what’s fair, what they’ll get the return on [00:35:00] and what isn’t going to be a big hassle for you to do.

Like, do you have a staff? Do you, is it just you? Um, is it just you, is it, are you doing unboxings? Are you doing, you know, and you can set levels based on how much space. On your website, how long of an ad? How, how many times are you going to post per week? And you sort of like can set levels based on that.

Lisa is, I use divvy. I hate it at first, but I’ve grown to really like it. And the support groups are helpful. Danielle says, for some reason my downloads have gone down per episode, but Mary temporary explanation. Yeah. The holidays, usually everyone gets a dip right about now because people are traveling.

They don’t have time to listen on a regular basis. Um, So, yeah, probably it’s that if it’s, if you, I mean, if you don’t think it’s that, uh, it could be that the algorithm has changed a little bit. Um, I don’t think it has anything to do with your content. It’s it just ebbs and flows like Elsie and I have been flowed to our show goes down right around [00:36:00] now.

It always goes up around a podcast conference, whether we’re there or not. And then it always goes back down in the month or two after is probably picking up. People are sick of that. And then it goes right back up for another conference. So all shows ebb and flow. So I wouldn’t take that as any kind of, any kind of like statement about your work at all.

Um, Karen asks, do you need to consider the length of your show? I’ve got a 10 minute art pontic yeah, so I wouldn’t do longer than a minute. I wouldn’t do longer than a minute spot and I wouldn’t do more than two. If you have a 10 minute show and yet it’s 10 minutes of full content, you know, you might, and also, I wouldn’t do a mid roll because it’s only 10 minutes.

So you’re going to want to do one at the beginning. And one of the end don’t offer mid-roll some shows don’t offer mid-roll, that’s just the way it is. And it’s okay. Most 10 minute shows do one at the beginning and one at the end or two in the beginning, and then they do their show. So it’s okay to do that hygiene.

Um, And I think that’s it. Does anyone else have any other questions that I [00:37:00] can answer for you? Because if not, I’m gonna, what am I going to go do some more sponsors? I think that’s it. Okay. Thank you guys so much for being here. I love seeing you guys happy new year, everyone. I’m so excited that you were here today.

Thank you. If you have any questions for me. Go ahead and put them in the comments. Um, see you soon. Keep my secret. Bye.

New Report

Close